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tetrahedron

Defines: 
regular tetrahedron
Keywords: 
Polyhedron
Type of Math Object: 
Definition
Major Section: 
Reference

Mathematics Subject Classification

51E99 no label found

Comments

The definition of n-agons and polyhedrons can be exposed in only one entry. I don't see the utility to display so many entries for definitions that are analogous and, beside the point, trivial.

the proper way, of course
is to mention this on the "polyhedron" entry
nd then addind "tetrahedron" to the "also defines" field on the edit entry dialog
f
G -----> H G
p \ /_ ----- ~ f(G)
\ / f ker f
G/ker f

As you can see, there are a lot of things which can be said about tetrahedra which are not special cases of general facts. Therefore, it is good for the tertrahedra to have their own special place.

I just read your article and it was totally great, it contains a lot of useful ideas, it is also written in organize manner,thanks for sharing this kind of article.

I think I have a greater understanding of a tetrahedron now, your explanation was simple enough. I was thinking of studying mathematics at university, but instead opted to go into computing, repair diagnostics, sys backup & recovery etc... which has turned out to be most helpful for me, at least.

A small by-product of research in area of pseudoprimesPlanetmathPlanetmath in k(i): Take a productPlanetmathPlanetmath of two numbers each with shape 4m+3. Let x be this composite number. x is pseudo to base (x-1).Examples 21, 33, 57 etc. (20^20-1)/21 yields a rational integer.

Let X be a square matrix in which each element is an odd prime. Then (a^(X-I)-I)/X yields a square matrix in which the elements belong to Z. Here a is co-prime with each element of X. Also I is the identity matrix.

I use pari software and sometimes I would like to display the calculations/programs on the space for messages; however, I am unable to paste them. Would be glad if this and adding files are enabled.

Fermat’s theorem works in terms of square matrices; however Euler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theorem in terms of matrices does not seem to be true.

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